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What is the difference between the MRDS and the Webots?

    Question

  • I am a newbie in robotics, and planning make a simulation of eel-like robot, my classmate have done it with Webots, but I would like to make it with MRDS. I have learned it one month, but I still fall into the CCR, I think it is so difficult. And till now, I have no idea about the MRDS simulation. Can it works as Webots? I am afraid that I make a wrong choice and know it after several months. Can the MRDS control the servo motor in a complex way, such as send a SIN wave signals?

    And, it is said that the MRDS can control the hardware, what level? Only lego or boe-bot etc.? Can it control a SCM?

    I have just studied some primary C#, and not clear about how CCR works? I have bought the Professional MRDS, but it is professional. So should I read some other books?
    Monday, June 01, 2009 12:41 AM

Answers

  • This is a really difficult question to answer. Webots and MRDS are entirely different. I think the simulator in MRDS is probably better than Webots because it includes a Physics Engine, but it's hard to compare them. Developing a snake-like robot will be complicated in either simulator.

    MRDS can control any sort of hardware, but you will probably need to write your own services. There are examples in the book for the SCC-32 servo controller from Lynxmotion. MRDS does not do things such as send sine waves to a servo. You would have to generate the sine wave yourself and send the commands to the servo. That's not difficult if you already have an appropriate service for the servo.

    Trevor
    • Marked as answer by Tcq Tuesday, June 02, 2009 7:14 AM
    Monday, June 01, 2009 7:03 AM

All replies

  • This is a really difficult question to answer. Webots and MRDS are entirely different. I think the simulator in MRDS is probably better than Webots because it includes a Physics Engine, but it's hard to compare them. Developing a snake-like robot will be complicated in either simulator.

    MRDS can control any sort of hardware, but you will probably need to write your own services. There are examples in the book for the SCC-32 servo controller from Lynxmotion. MRDS does not do things such as send sine waves to a servo. You would have to generate the sine wave yourself and send the commands to the servo. That's not difficult if you already have an appropriate service for the servo.

    Trevor
    • Marked as answer by Tcq Tuesday, June 02, 2009 7:14 AM
    Monday, June 01, 2009 7:03 AM
  • Oh, Mr Taylor , I am glad to see your answer, and I am reading your book. It is difficult to me. I have no idea about the CCR, although I do the example on the book step by step. I think it is the problem of lack the knowledge of thread management. Should I read some related books? Could you recomend one of them? And, If I want to make the snake-like simulation, is there a short cut?  Everytime I open the book with 800 pages, I doubt if there is one day I can finished my simulation.
    Monday, June 01, 2009 7:20 AM
  • Unfortunately there are no short-cuts. You have selected a difficult topic regardless of the platform that you choose. A snake simulation will require multiple joints that have to be moved in a coordinated manner. Also, simulation requires additional skills in 3D modelling. (If you were building a real snake robot it would require hardware skills).

    I realise that the book is 800 pages, but it is in four sections and you do not need to read all of them. You can ignore VPL for instance, and several of the hardware chapters will not be relevant. You should look at the chapters on simulation, and especially the sample that shows how the different types of joints work.

    Trevor

    Tuesday, June 02, 2009 5:31 AM
  • Thank you for your answer. I will dive into the mrds for the further days.
    Tuesday, June 02, 2009 7:14 AM
  • You may find this article comparing several different robot simulators enlightening: http://linuxdevices.com/articles/AT9631072539.html

    www.coroware.com
    Sunday, June 07, 2009 3:54 AM
  • Oh, thank you . It is very helpful.
    Tuesday, June 09, 2009 6:36 AM