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Linux vs Windows using PHP or ASP? I'm confused

    Question

  • I have been hosting my website on a Linux server because of the advertiser I allow require php

    However I'm considering swtiching to Windows so I can use .asp files and run my forms without frontpage extensions. At least I'm thinking that's how it works at this point.

    Is that true? Do I have to use extension with Expressions web like I did in FrontPage?

    Someone please give me an idea what the advantages and disadvantages are of Linux vs Windows so I can make a decision that won't bite me in the butt a few months down the road. 

    Thanks. 
    Friday, November 14, 2008 4:11 PM

Answers

  • If you don't want to use FrontPage extensions and you're already using PHP, there's really not much that you need classic ASP for which you couldn't do with PHP.

    I think that the quality of support and service would play a bigger role in your analysis than whether UNIX/ Windows.  In my experience the quality of the host has always been the weak link more than the flavor of the server.

    personally, I like the FP extensions if only for the http:// publishing.
    Chris Leeds Microsoft Press "Expression Web 2 Step by Step" http://ExpressionWebStepByStep.com/
    Friday, November 14, 2008 4:23 PM

All replies

  • If you don't want to use FrontPage extensions and you're already using PHP, there's really not much that you need classic ASP for which you couldn't do with PHP.

    I think that the quality of support and service would play a bigger role in your analysis than whether UNIX/ Windows.  In my experience the quality of the host has always been the weak link more than the flavor of the server.

    personally, I like the FP extensions if only for the http:// publishing.
    Chris Leeds Microsoft Press "Expression Web 2 Step by Step" http://ExpressionWebStepByStep.com/
    Friday, November 14, 2008 4:23 PM
  • Thanks for helping Chris.

    My host is Godaddy and they tend to hate FP Extensions (not sure why except that it causes them wok when people break them)

    But I did my new web design in .asp so I could unify navigation, footer and other files for quick changes. So I'd like to go this way for the ease of use for me.

    I am also struggling with getting the forms to work, which is easy if I use the extensions, but another learning curve if I have to figure our their .php form mailers.

    So I'm still wondering if I have to turn on extensions if I'm using .asp files or do the forms work (send email) without it?

    Also, does it make any difference in terms of SEO? Do the search engines rank .asp pages differently?
    Friday, November 14, 2008 4:37 PM
  • You can use PHP to process your forms. Expression Web 2 has support for it built-in though not the actual scripting. Chris has forms processors on his site http://veighn.com James Huggins FP MVP has a php forms processor  with very detailed documentation that is almost a book on php itself. http://jameshuggins.com
    MS MVP Expression http://by-expression.com
    Friday, November 14, 2008 4:38 PM
  • Also, most Linux providers support classic ASP, and with Mono, many support ASP.NET through framework 2.0, which is sufficient for much of the ASP.NET functionality provided by EW2. If you choose to go with a Windows provider, all that I have encountered to date also support php (v.5), so you're not closing out any options if you decide to go that way.

    I'll second Chris's opinion that the quality of service and support offered by a provider is a primary factor in your choice. Unless you're sure that you will need ASP.NET support you can make your choice based on that. I need framework 3.5 support, so I use a Windows host currently, but if you don't, and if the prospective host offers ASP.NET through v.2, make your choice based on service and support.

    cheers,
    scott

    Friday, November 14, 2008 5:35 PM
  • I just spoke with Godaddy and was informed that .htaccess files won't work in the Windows hosting. Does that sound right to anyone? It wouldn't be the first time I've received information from a support rep.

    If that's the case, what's the best way to develop my new site?

    If I save all my pages as .php I should be able to make changes in navigation etc more readily. I can then create 301 redirects for the pages that are now known as .htm
    Friday, November 14, 2008 9:43 PM
  • htaccess is an Apache configuration file so it isn't surprising it doesn't work on IIS.
    MS MVP Expression http://by-expression.com
    Saturday, November 15, 2008 1:32 AM